Tag Archives: unesco world heritage site

Japan – UNESCO – Buddhist Monuments in the Horyu-ji Area

Horyu-ji – Kyozo Hall

Founded by Prince Shotoku, who is attributed with having introduced Buddhism to Japan, Horyuji is one of Japan’s oldest temples. Its main hall, five storied pagoda and central gate, all located in the temple’s Saiin Garan (Western Precinct) and dating from the 7th century, are the world’s oldest surviving wooden structures.

Next to the Saiin Garan is the newly constructed Daihozoin, a hall that exhibits a part of the temple’s art collection. The main attraction of the Horyuji’s Toin Garan (Eastern Precinct) is the Yumedono, the Hall of Visions.

In 1993, Horyuji was designated a UNESCO world heritage site. Unlike many other historic attractions in Japan, Horyuji is wheelchair accessible and provides pamphlets in various foreign languages.

(www.japan-guide.com)

Romania – UNESCO – Dacian Fortesses

Built in murus dacicus style, the six Dacian Fortresses of the Orăștie Mountains, in Romania, were created in the 1st centuries BC and AD as protection against Roman conquest.

Their extensive and well-preserved remains present a picture of a vigorous and innovative ancient civilization. Today, treasure-hunters sometimes search the area, as Romania lacks legislation in this domain.

The six fortresses – Sarmizegetusa Regia, Costeşti-Cetăţuie, Costeşti-Blidaru, Piatra Roşie, Băniţa and Căpâlna – that formed the defensive system of Decebalus were designated as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1999, as well as the settlement and fortifications at Feţele Albe.

Dacian Fortress of Sarmizegetusa Regia

 

The town of Sarmizegetusa Regia was the capital and major fortress of the Dacian kingdom, probably built in the mid first century BCE. It consisted of perimeter walls and fortifications, a sacred precinct, and a settlement area primarily for nobles and supporting servants. It was located at the top of a 1200 meter hill with excellent visibility of the surrounding lands. The sacred precinct was on the east side of the town, with a prominent plaza and circular shrines. There were two settlement areas one on the east side and a larger one on the west. In addition to dwellings they included workshops, storage buildings, and agricultural processing areas. Notable for the time is a distribution system for drinking water that used ceramic pipes.

Dacian Fortess of Costești – Blidaru