Tag Archives: Ireland

More than interesting Ireland Literature Stamp

Ireland-2013-Literary-StampIrish postage stamp, 60 cents, celebrates the UNESCO City of Literature

 

It’s a city associated with great writers like Oscar Wilde and James Joyce.

A handful of Nobel Prizes for literature have been awarded to this city’s luminaries including poet William Butler Yeats and “Mr. Waiting for Godot,” Samuel Beckett.

The literary heritage is reflected in the city’s libraries and book stores as well as its river bridges which are also named after writers.

This city that’s halfway up Ireland’s east coast was once a Viking settlement. The River Liffey made it easy for the Norse men to sail their ships in and out.

The Irish city that was once a Viking village and is now famous for its literature is Dublin.

The list of writers, poets and playwrights associated with Dublin is a long one. Or perhaps it’s a far-reaching, elongated, and meandering one.

In any case, one on the newest literary voices is a talented teenager. 17-year-old Eoin Moore wrote a short story for a creative writing program for teenagers called Fighting Words.

His story was chosen to be published. But the coolest thing is that it was published on Ireland newest postage stamp. All 224 words of it.

The stamp celebrates Dublin’s designation as a UNESCO City of Literature.

It’s a bright yellow, rectangular stamp (see above) with just enough space to display Eoin Moore’s story, and it’s now available at Irish post offices throughout Dublin…for just 60 cents.

http://pri.org/

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Ireland – Dunquin

Dún Chaoin (anglicized as Dunquin), meaning “Caon’s stronghold”, is a Gaeltacht village in west County Kerry, Ireland. Dunquin lies at the Western tip of the Dingle Peninsula, overlooking the Blasket Islands.

There is breath-taking cliff scenery, with a view of the Blasket Islands, where Peig Sayers lived. A museum in the village tells the story of the Blaskets and the well-known writers of the island, including Sayers, Tomás Ó Criomhthain, and Muiris Ó Súilleabháin. In 1588, when the Spanish Armada returned via Ireland many ships sought shelter in the Blasket Sound — the area between Dunquin and the Islands — and some were wrecked there. A memorial stands on the cliffs overlooking the site.

Ireland – Newgrange Megalithic Passage Tomb

The Megalithic Passage Tomb at Newgrange was built about 3200 BC. The kidney shaped mound covers an area of over one acre and is surrounded by 97 kerbstones, some of which are richly decorated with megalithic art. The 19 meter long inner passage leads to a cruciform chamber with a corbelled roof. It is estimated that the construction of the Passage Tomb at Newgrange would have taken a work force of 300 at least 20 years.

The passage and chamber of Newgrange are illuminated by the winter solstice sunrise. A shaft of sunlight shines through the roof box over the entrance and penetrates the passage to light up the chamber. The dramatic event lasts for 17 minutes at dawn on the Winter Solstice and for a few mornings either side of the Winter Solstice.

Ireland – Rock of Cashel

The Rock of Cashel (Carraig Phádraig), more formally St. Patrick’s Rock, it is also known as Cashel of the Kings. Long before the Norman invasion The Rock of Cashel was the seat of the High Kings of Munster, although there is little structural evidence of their time here. Most of the buildings on the current site date from the 12th and 13th centuries when the rock was gifted to the Church. The buildings represent both Hiberno-Romanseque and Germanic influences in their architecture.

The legendary origin of the Rock of Cashel dates back to approximately 432 AD. Now a market town, Cashel was once a center of royal and religious power. According to legend, St. Patrick arrived in Cashel in AD 432 and baptized King Aengus, who became Ireland’s first Christian ruler. During the baptism, the devil hurriedly flew over Ireland and, hindered by the Slieve Bloom Mountains, the flying fiend took an enormous bite out of the stony peaks. After he reached the opposite side of the mountains, the devil spat out his mountainous mouthful and inadvertently formed the Rock of Cashel. The legendary origin of the Rock of Cashel, then, also explains the gap (known as the Devil’s Bite) in the Slieve Bloom Mountains, which can be seen to the north of the rock.
Besides tales explaining the legendary origin of the Rock of Cashel, other stories exist that link this location to the emergence of the shamrock as an Irish symbol. According to legend, during the baptism, St. Patrick plucked a shamrock to explain the mystery of the Trinity and so gave Christian Ireland a powerful new emblem.

Ireland – Duncannon

Duncannon is a village in southwest County Wexford, Ireland. Bordered to the west by Waterford harbour and sitting on a rocky promontory jutting into the channel is the strategically prominent Duncannon Fort which dominates the village.

According to legend, the settlement at Duncannon dates back to the time of Fionn mac Cumhaill and the Fianna in the 3rd century AD.

Primarily a fishing village, Duncannon also relies heavily on tourism and is situated on the clearly signposted and very scenic Ring of Hook drive. Duncannon boasts a mile long, blue flag recipient golden beach and is a very popular spot with locals and tourists alike.
Duncannon Fort, which was built in 1588 incorporates a maritime museum, Arts centre, café and craft shop and is open daily to visitors from June to September.