Tag Archives: cathedral

Brasil – Cathedral of Brasilia

The Cathedral of Brasília (Catedral Metropolitana Nossa Senhora Aparecida) is the Roman Catholic cathedral serving Brasília, Brazil, and serves as the seat of the Archdiocese of Brasília. It was designed by Oscar Niemeyer, and was completed and dedicated on May 31, 1970. The cathedral is a hyperboloid structure constructed from 16 concrete columns, weighing 90 tons each.

The exterior of the cathedral resembles the circular plan and ribbed structure of Liverpool Metropolitan Cathedral, but the latter is clad in solid material, while the Cathedral of Brasília allows light in and out for almost the full height of the ribs.

Germany – Aachen

Aachen, also known in English by its French name Aix-la-Chapelle, has historically been a spa town in North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany. Aachen was a favoured residence of Charlemagne, and the place of coronation of the Kings of Germany. Geographically, Aachen is the westernmost town of Germany, located along its borders with Belgium and the Netherlands, 65 km (40 mi) west of Cologne. RWTH Aachen University, one of Germany’s Universities of Excellence, is located in the city.

The Aachen Cathedral was erected on the orders of Charlemagne in AD 786 and was on completion the largest dome north of the Alps. On his death Charlemagne’s remains were interred in the cathedral and can be seen there to this date. The cathedral was extended several times in later ages, turning it into a curious and unique mixture of building styles.

The 14th century city hall lies between two central places, the Markt (market place) and the Katschhof (between city hall and cathedral). The coronation hall is on the first floor of the building. Inside you can find five frescoes by the Aachen artist Alfre Rethel which show legendary scenes from the life of Charlemagne, as well as Charlemagne’s signature.

The Grashaus, a late medieval house at the Markt, is one of the oldest non-religious buildings in downtown Aachen. It hosts the city archive. The Grashaus was the former city hall before the present building took over this function.

The Elisenbrunnen is one of the most famous sights of Aachen. It is a neoclassical hall covering one of the city’s famous fountains. It is just a minute away from the cathedral. Just a few steps in southeastern direction lies the 19th century theatre.

Also well known and well worth seeing are the two remaining city gates, the Ponttor, one half mile northwest of the cathedral, and the Kleinmarschiertor, close to the central railway station. There are also a few parts of both medieval city walls left, most of them integrated in more recent buildings, some others visible. There are even five towers left, some of which are used for housing.

There are many other places and objects worth seeing, for example a notable number of churches and monasteries, a few remarkable 17th- and 18th-century buildings in the particular Baroque style typical of the region, a collection of statues and monuments, park areas, cemeteries, amongst others. The area’s industrial history is reflected in dozens of 19th- and early twentieth-century manufacturing sites in the city.

Czech Republic – Brno

Brno is the second largest city in the Czech Republic, located in the southeast of the country.
It was founded in 1243, although the area had been settled since the 5th century. Brno is the capital of the South Moravian Region as well as the seat of the Constitutional Court of the Czech Republic, the Supreme Court, the Supreme Administrative Court, the Supreme Prosecutor’s Office and the Ombudsman. Traditionally, it has served as the capital of the historical land Moravia.

Croatia – Sibenik – Cathedral of St. James

Sibenik is political, economic, social and cultural centre of Sibenik-Knin county in Dalmatia, Croatia. Placed in the middle part of Croatian Adriatic coast, in picturesque, well-indented, bay in which river Krka empties. There are 42 000 inhabitants. From all other cities on Adriatic Sibenik takes a special place. While Solin, Trogir, Hvar and Vis were Greek, Roman and Byzantine’s, Sibenik is a “new city “, founded just as a balance to the Byzantine’s Dalmatia. That’s why Sibenik is the oldest Croatian city on Adriatic.

The Cathedral of St. James in Šibenik, is a triple-nave basilica with three apses and a dome (32 m high inside) in the city of Šibenik, Croatia. It is the church of the Catholic Church in Croatia, and the see of the Šibenik diocese. It is also the most important architectural monument of the Renaissance in the entire country. Since 2000, the Cathedral has been on the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Belgium – Antwerpen

Antwerp is a city and municipality in Belgium and the capital of the Antwerp province in Flanders, one of Belgium’s three regions.

Antwerp was the first city to host the World Gymnastics Championships, in 1903. During World War I, the city became the fallback point of the Belgian Army after the defeat at Liège. It was taken after heavy fighting by the German Army, and the Belgians were forced to retreat westward.

Antwerp hosted the 1920 Summer Olympics. During World War II, the city was an important strategic target because of its port. It was occupied by Germany in May 1940 and liberated by the British 11th Armoured Division on 4 September 1944. The city itself was severely damaged and rebuilt after the war in a modern style.