Category Archives: Finland

Finland – old views

Finland – Esbo – 1898

 

Finland – Tampere – 1948

 

Finland – Pasila – Hertankatu – 1971

Finland – cities

Uusikaupunki  is a town and municipality of Finland. It is located in the province of Western Finland and is part of the Finland Proper region.

 

 

Uusikaupunki  is a town and municipality of Finland. It is located in the province of Western Finland and is part of the Finland Proper region.

In 1721, the Peace of Nystad was signed in Uusikaupunki, ending the Great Northern War between Sweden and Russia.

The original name of the main village that was incorporated into Uusikaupunki was Kalainen (which is a Finnish adjective meaning “having plenty of fish”). The village of Kalainen originated as a market place for the people of Vakka-Suomi. The town of Uusikaupunki was founded as a town with the rights of commerce in 1617 by decree by Gustav II Adolf.

 

Jakobstad (Finnish: Pietarsaari) is a town and municipality in Ostrobothnia, Finland.

The town was founded in 1652 by Ebba Brahe, the widow of the military commander Jacob De la Gardie, and was granted city privileges by Queen Christina of Sweden. The Swedish name literally means Jacob’s City or Jacob’s Town. The town was founded at the old harbour of the parish Pedersöre and this name lives on in the Finnish name of the municipality, Pietarsaari, literally Peter’s Island. Pedersöre remains an independent municipality neighbouring Jakobstad.

 

Hamina ( Swedish: Fredrikshamn) is a town and a municipality of Finland. It is located in the province of Southern Finland and is part of the Kymenlaakso region.

The Town Hall was originally built in 1798 and it was renovated by Carl Ludvig Engel in 1840.

In 1721, the Peace of Nystad was signed in Uusikaupunki, ending the Great Northern War between Sweden and Russia.

The original name of the main village that was incorporated into Uusikaupunki was Kalainen (which is a Finnish adjective meaning “having plenty of fish”). The village of Kalainen originated as a market place for the people of Vakka-Suomi. The town of Uusikaupunki was founded as a town with the rights of commerce in 1617 by decree by Gustav II Adolf.

Finland – Suomenlinna Fortress

 

Suomenlinna, until 1918 Viapori (Finnish), or Sveaborg (Swedish), is an inhabited sea fortress built on six islands (Kustaanmiekka, Susisaari, Iso-Mustasaari, Pikku-Mustasaari, Länsi-Mustasaari and Långören), and which now forms part of the city of Helsinki, the capital of Finland.

In 1747 the Swedish Diet made a decision to fortify the eastern border and to establish a place d’armes on islands outside Helsinki. France, with which Sweden had a military alliance, financed a great part of the construction during the first decades.

Sveaborg was the largest construction project in Sweden in the 18th century. It was constructed under the supervision and direction of Lieutenant-Colonel Augustin Ehrensvard, assisted by the best Swedish engineering and mechanics experts. The fortress was constructed by soldiers in the regular army from all over Sweden and Finland. At its height, the construction crew totalled more than 6500. When Ehrensvard died in 1772, the fortress was virtually ready for use. The overall plan was revisecf in 1774.

European power politics also determined Sveaborg’s fate. In the war of 1808-1809, which was a direct consequence of the treaties between Napoleon and Alexander I, Russia occupied Finland. Sveaborg surrendered and became a Russian garrison for the following 110 years. At the turn of the century there were about 4000 Russian soldiers in Sveaborg. The fortress remained in the state it had been under Swedish rule until the bombings during the Crimean War in 1855, when the British and French Navies ·fired on the fort. In the repairs and modernisation , undertaken after .that, some of the damaged buildings were torn down or made lower and a new coastal defence line of earth banks was constructed.

Before the First World War, Sveaborg, mainly serving as a depot area, formed part of the defence scheme, “Peter the Great’s Sea Fortress”. The intention was that Sveaborg, together with Tallinn, would block off the entire Gulf of Finland and guarantee the security of St Petersburg, the Capital of Russia. After Finland became independent in 1917, Sveaborg became a Finnish garrison and was renamed in Finnish as Suomenlinna. It served as a prison camp after the Civil War in 1918-1919. Suomenlinna was in military use for the last time during the Second World War when it served as one of Helsinki’s air surveillance centres. It served as a garrison until 1972. Its use for tourism and recreation began on a larger scale after 1963 .

 

Finland – Savonlinna

Savonlinna, a popular spa and holiday resort, lies in the middle of the Saimaa lake system in southeastern Finland, between the Haapavesi to the north and the Pihlajavesi to the south. The town grew up around the castle of Olavinlinna and received its municipal charter in 1639. The oldest part of the town … More > is picturesquely situated on an island between two waterways, with the newer districts on the mainland to the west. Savonlinna is one of the main centers of the boat services on Lake Saimaa.

The building of Olavinlinna, castle of St. Olaf, began in 1475. The Danish-born founder of the castle, knight Erik Axelsson Tott, decided that a powerful fortification should be build to protect the strategically important Savo region. The castle was supposed to repel Russian attacks from the east and to guarantee the control of the Savo region for the Swedish Crown. The history of Olavinlinna is a mixture of medieval arms clashing, cannons roaring and every-day chores inside the security of the castle’s thick walls.

The changes in the ownership of the castle left their mark on Olavinlinna: this can be seen in the varied architecture of the castle. These days the castle’s halls and rooms can be rented and used for all kinds of events.